Can You Clean With Just Water?

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Can You Clean With Just Water?

by WSJ Live 3:31 mins

Can You Clean With Just Water?

by WSJ Live 3:31 mins

OXO and other manufacturers of micro-fiber cleaning clothes are trying to convince consumers that warm water is enough. WSJ reporter Ellen Byron explains "the new clean" on Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero.In a recent WSJ article, Byron writes: Cleaning products tout a litany of powers: fast action, germ fighting and pleasant fragrance. How could the house get as clean with just water? Makers of microfiber cloths, fancy sponges and high-tech brushes claim their tools can do just that. Spritzing some water—and splurging on a $113 mop or a $27 dusting cloth—can achieve a sparkling home, these companies say. There are different sponges for scrubbing stainless steel, granite or stove tops, and specialized towels for mirrors, furniture and kitchen counters. Also, each room should have its own cleaning cloth, preferably in different colors to avoid mix-ups, companies say. A big challenge is convincing people to forgo the fragrance of traditional cleaners. For many, a scent of pine, lemon or tropical breeze is a lasting payoff for their efforts and a bragging card to others that a room has been recently cleaned. The target audience for the new products is people concerned that chemical cleaners could pose harm to their families, pets and the finishes of wood floors, countertops and appliances. Increased scrutiny of household products' ingredients, including the Food and Drug Administration's current safety review of triclosan, which is found in antibacterial soaps, has prompted consumers to rethink how they clean their homes.

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In a recent WSJ article, Byron writes: Cleaning products tout a litany of powers: fast action, germ fighting and pleasant fragrance. How could the house get as clean with just water? Makers of microfiber cloths, fancy sponges and high-tech brushes claim their tools can do just that. Spritzing some water—and splurging on a $113 mop or a $27 dusting cloth—can achieve a sparkling home, these companies say. There are different sponges for scrubbing stainless steel, granite or stove tops, and specialized towels for mirrors, furniture and kitchen counters. Also, each room should have its own cleaning cloth, preferably in different colors to avoid mix-ups, companies say. A big challenge is convincing people to forgo the fragrance of traditional cleaners. For many, a scent of pine, lemon or tropical breeze is a lasting payoff for their efforts and a bragging card to others that a room has been recently cleaned. The target audience for the new products is people concerned that chemical cleaners could pose harm to their families, pets and the finishes of wood floors, countertops and appliances. Increased scrutiny of household products' ingredients, including the Food and Drug Administration's current safety review of triclosan, which is found in antibacterial soaps, has prompted consumers to rethink how they clean their homes.">

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