Doomsday Entrepreneurs Charge $5,000 Admission to Survival Bunker

At this point, doomsday groups are a dollar a dozen. They've cropped up in every corner of the world, some flocking to French mountain communes, while others are sharing the paranoia on reality television. Yet another subset of doomsday theorists are using the inevitable destruction of the world as we know it to line their pockets-or, you know, to build a massive bunker somewhere in the Tenterfield wilderness.

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The price of admission? Just $5,000.

This group of New South Wales survivalists, led by refrigeration mechanic Simon Young, believes that Biblical prophecy, environmental change, and ancient Egyptian texts prove that the world is destined for devastation. They opine that Armageddon will occur around December 21, just as many other end-of-the-world conspiracy theorists have surmised, and they aren't going to take it lying down.

Their plan is to built an enormous concrete bunker approximately 1.2 kilometers above sea level. They feel this is the best way to survive the inevitable destruction of mankind, since the ocean is expected to play a major part in wiping out human life.

Groups like this one are taking advantage of the paranoia surrounding 2012 and doomsday prophesies, and while they might actually believe that the world is coming to an end, scientists do not agree. Government organizations, including NASA, have worked hard to dispel any concerns that 2012 might yield some catastrophic event that could destroy life as we know it.

Even the Mayan calendar seems to indicate that end-of-the-world paranoia is misplaced.

The exact location of the Tenterfield bunker has not been revealed, and Young has not disclosed how many occupants it will serve. His is not the only bunker in the world, however, as doomsday theorists have been hard at work building survival shelters both above and below ground.

In Kansas, luxury doomsday condos promise a way to ride out the apocalypse in style. The bunkers are spacious, and owners have access to such modern conveniences as "a pool, a movie theater, and a library". The developer plans to build more bunkers once space in the first has sold out, which means buyers will be laying out millions of dollars for insurance against the end of the world.

Doomsday bunkers are typically designed to protect occupants from specific threats. Some assume that doomsday will come in the form of some sort of biological weapon, and are therefore designed with independent air filtration systems and ways to block out the outside atmosphere. Others suppose the end of the world will be caused by environmental shifts, hungry zombies, or an infinite number of other scenarios. It seems unlikely, however, that any bunker, no matter how well constructed, could ward off every possible threat.